Tag: Support Our Troops

Memorial Day Poppies

Ross Dunfee World War I concluded with about 10 million military personnel killed, and a like number of civilians. One particularly bloody battle during WWI was at the Second Battle of Ypres (Belgium) where, on April 22, 1915, Germany fired 150 tons of lethal chlorine gas against two French and Algerian Divisions and two days…

U.S. Military History: U.S. Navy Flag, Seal, and Song

Ross Dunfee Flag: What do you think of when reading the following list: Fluked, Admiralty, Stockless, Grapnel, Herreshoff, Northill, CQR, Delta, Danforth, and Bruce? If your answer was “various kinds of anchors,” you are correct. The first (unofficial) flag of the Continental Navy, called the Infantry Battalion Flag, was adopted in December 1864. It consisted…

U.S. Military History: Some U.S. Navy History

Ross Dunfee Prior to the American Revolution, the colonies had no naval forces, but did have a large maritime population and many merchant vessels employed in domestic and foreign trade. That merchant service was familiar not only with the sea but also with warfare. On Oct. 13, 1775, the Continental Congress authorized the first Navy.…

U.S. Military History: Some U.S. Marine Corps History

Ross Dunfee What is a Marine? A sailor, a soldier, infantry, amphibious assault members? They are all–soldiers serving on ships ready for land action. Their history, etched in antiquity, has records in ancient Greece and Rome. In the 17th century, the English, in its wars with the Dutch, referred to Marine units as naval infantry.…

U.S. Military History: Independence Day

Ross Dunfee The first successful English colony settled in America was at Jamestown, Va., in 1607—and the migration was on—primarily of British, German, and Dutch extraction, but immigrants arrived from throughout Europe. Communities were settled and financed primarily by privately-organized British settlers or families using free enterprise without any significant English royal or Parliamentary government…

U.S. Military History: D-Day

Ross Dunfee So, what does the “D” stand for in D-Day? Stop! Do not keep reading until you attempt to answer the question. Okay, now you can read on. Most people who celebrate the holiday do not know the answer. Some people believe it is in reference to June 6, 1944, when, in World War…

Memorial Day

Ross Dunfee The killing was over. The four-year long Civil War officially ended at Appomattox, Va. April 9, 1865. There was a large division between the northern states (largely industrial) and the southern states (largely agrarian) over slavery, states’ rights, and westward expansion. The election of Lincoln was the last straw, and by one month…